Kaiwiki

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Neighborhood Alert

Yesterday, the 2nd of October, a neighbor near Kaiwiki Park saw a fully clothed man or woman wearing a helmet on a new looking moped (silver & red) who stopped to open and close her mailbox. Before doing so, the neighbor saw the moped parked at Kaiwiki Park pavilion.  My husband said he too saw the same moped cruise up and down this area.
The neighbor alerted the police. If you see this suspicious moped rider, please take down plate number and either reply here or call me at 961.0692.  I’ll then give information to my neighbor to follow up with police.
Mahalo,
Gail Seavers


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Kaiwiki News

Thank you for all that supported the T-Shirt Membership Campaign.  We sold 39 shirts and raised $63.18 in additional donations (Thank you Beverly Fuller, Gail Marshall, Joseph Withers, and Kitty Heacox for your generous donations), resulting in the Grand Total Raised amount of $529.08! That will go a long way.  I am told that orders will ship no later than 5/5/2016. For those who opted to have the shirts delivered to me, I will send out an email when they arrive and make pick up/drop off arrangements.

There is some momentum forming around how we can preserve and improve the Park & Pavilion.  Please email Torrey at  torrey_lynch@mac.com if you have an interest in this topic.

Also, The Hawaii County Planning Dept. has been having public meetings on the Hamakua CDP. If you have not attended and would like to provide input, the draft is available online. This is already towards the tail end of the process, but it’s still an opportunity to say something.  http://www.hawaiicountycdp.info/hamakua-cdp

Aloha

John Lawler
john@johnrlawler.com


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Celebration of Life

Aunty Elizabeth was on this earth 94 1/2 years.
Charles was the original sweet corn grower up until her second stroke in 1991.
He’s been her primary caregiver ever since – 25 years, give or take.
“There but for the grace of God go I”

Mahalo for your kind thoughts & prayers

Aunty Elizabeth’s Celebration of Life will be
Monday, 7 March, 2016 @ Kaiwiki Park Pavilion
(12:00 noon)


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Papaya Leaf Cure for Dengue Fever

Papaya Leaf Cure for Dengue Fever

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Papaya Tree Leaves

With the number of people catching dengue fever seemingly on the rise every year in Costa Rica, especially during this rainy season, the demand for a simple and inexpensive remedy has never been higher, and as with so many common ailments, the modern medical system is not very helpful. The good news is that researchers in India have managed to discover a good remedy for dengue based on an old folk cure. It is the common papaya leaf. Since they’ve discovered this, many people from India have managed to successfully and quickly cure dengue without spending a fortune on hospital visits. The best news of all is that you can easily make it at home.

Sounds too good to be true? Well, plenty of studies have showed positive results. Moreover, the well-respected HoaxorFact.com website that analyzes the truth behind the wild claims we often see on the internet, has confirmed that this cure is legit: (Hoax or Fact article on Papaya Leaf Dengue Cure)

What is Dengue

Aedes Aegypti Dengue Mosquito Dengue is a virus transmitted by the Aedes-type mosquito, a species not native to Costa Rica. It’s a painful flu-type disease that exists in many tropical towns and cities where there are lots of people who create habitat for it such as old tires, coconut husks, blocked gutters, plastic tarps, and anything else that can form small pools of water. This mosquito is active during the day, and often bites at the ankles while the victim is sitting at a table with his or her legs in the shadows. According to Costa Rica’s Ministry of Health, there were 23,000 cases in 2011 in this country, and the World Health Organization says there are 100 million cases every year worldwide.

There are four strains of Dengue, and each can develop into the more serious Hemorrhagic Fever, which requires hospitalization and can be fatal. With each infection of a new strain of Dengue, a person is increasingly like to contract Hemorrhagic fever. After being bitten by an infected mosquito, it usually takes 5-7 days for the first symptoms to occur. Common symptoms include fever with headache, severe muscle pain, joint pain and rashes on the body. Until now, there has been no effective medicine or vaccine for dengue. Common painkillers such as aspirin and Ibuprofen can all have bad side effects for Dengue sufferers, so victims have little pain relief (Acetaminophen is okay however.) It’s also important to keep people who have been infected under a mosquito net so they don’t infect others, because once they have the disease, any mosquito that bites them can transfer the disease to others. This is perhaps the most important, and least understood part of the fight against Dengue.

Until now, the treatment for Dengue was simple been to wait it out, letting the body’s immune system do the job in two weeks or so while the patient suffers painfully, and needs to go to the hospital regularly to check the blood for signs of Hemmorhagic Fever.

Benefits of Papaya Leaf

Papaya leaf as cure for dengue

At this time, the only known cure for Dengue is papaya leaf, which is still not well known to doctors or the public. The juice or pulp made from this plant has been found to be quite effective not only in fighting the symptoms of dengue fever, but also in curing it.

Specialists from the Indian Institute of Forest Management have recently conducted a thorough study on five patients. The outcome was pretty amazing. Within 24 hours from drinking the juice made of papaya leaves, all the subjects reported a significant improvement of their overall health, reduced side effects and increased comfort. On top of all, they didn’tt experienced any side effects.

After the study was conducted and the results were promoted in the pharmaceutical world and the internet, many companies have begun to formulate medicines made from papaya leaf extract. They have realized that papaya leaf is not only helpful in fighting dengue, but also possess some extraordinary anti-cancer and anti-malarial properties. According to a 2010 research from the reputable Journal of Ethnopharmacology, many enzymes found in papaya leaves are known for their anti-cancer properties, fighting breast, liver, cervix, pancreatic and lung cancer. These studies showcase the properties of papaya leaf and outline that it does not have any toxic effects on the body. Some doctors have moved even further, beginning to recommend papaya leaf as an integral part of chemotherapy treatments.

Another amazing benefit of papaya leaves is that they can fight other viral infection such as the common cold virus. These amazing natural ingredients have been found to regenerate white blood cells and platelets. Not only that, but they contain over 50 ingredients that support the immune system, including important Vitamins such as A, C and E.

Two Case Studies

      Shared by Dr.B.N.Viswanath, consultant in organic farming & Organic Terrace Gardens
      Bangalore, India Ph: 9845627217

Case Study 1:

        I would like to share with everyone this discovery from a friend’s son who just recovered from dengue.

He was in the hospital and his blood platelet count had dropped to 15,000 [normally should be 150-400,000], after 15 liters of blood transfusions, and was still in a critical state.

His father became so worried that he sought recommendations from various friends, and the advice he received saved his son. He told me that in desperation he had given him raw juice from papaya leaves. Within a day his platelet count had jumped up to 135,000, surprising his doctors and nurses, and he was discharged from hospital. He asked me to pass this good news around. This is the cure used:

“It is raw papaya leaves, 2 pcs just cleaned, pounded and squeezed with a filter cloth. You will only get one tablespoon per leaf. So two tablespoon per serving once a day. Do not boil or cook or rinse with hot water, it will loose its strength. Only the leafy part and no stem or sap. It is very bitter and you have to swallow it. But it works.”

Case Study 2:

        One of my friends, who was 32 years old, had dengue fever last year. She was in a serious condition with a platelet count down to 28,000 after three days in hospital. Water had started to fill her lungs and she was having a hard time breathing. Her doctor told her that there was no cure for dengue and we just had to wait for her immune system to build resistance to the virus and fight the battle on its own. She had two blood transfusions already and all of us were praying hard for her. But despite this, her platelet count continue to drop.

Fortunately, her mother-in-law heard that papaya juice would help with her fever, so she found some papaya leaves and squeezed the juice out. Within a day, her platelet count started to increase and her fever came down. We continued to give her the papaya and she recovered within 3 days. Amazing, but it’s true.

How to Prepare Papaya Leaf Juice at Home

Papaya Leaf Stems

For both of these methods, it’s very important to remember that papaya leaf has to be RAW, which means no boiling, nor cooking. Both methods have been reported to work well, but the leaves must be fresh, and do not make tea out of them.

      1.

The Juice Method

      . For this method, it is recommended to extract the juice out of papaya leaves by crushing. After removing the stems and other fibrous parts you should crush the other part, the greener one. You can use a cloth filter or any other type of device to squeeze the juice out. However, remember that the leaves have to be fresh. If you don’t use raw fresh papaya leaves, the outcome might not be that good and the positive effect will be minimized. You need about two leaves for each treatment. Take two tablespoons of juice every six hours, three times a day and you will certainly feel better.

2. The Paste Method. You can use a food processor or a grinder to turn the leaves into a paste. However, because it is quite bitter, it is recommended to mix it with some fresh juice. Take four teaspoons twice a day. After three days to one week, you will see the difference.

Author’s Note: I put one large and one small papaya leaf into my Omega vertically-oriented auger-style juicer, and out came about 1 1/4 tablespoons of juice, which I stupidly decided to drink pure to see just how bitter it was. I can tell you it is extremely, painfully bitter, and no amount of juice taken after-the-fact seems to be helping me now. I highly recommend that readers mix it with a good amount of sweet juice and not try to drink it straight unless you want to suffer.

Expected Results

Most patients who suffer of dengue see sign of improvement within 24 hours of starting the papaya leaf treatment, and many are totally cured within three days. Almost everyone recovers within a week, while patients that simply wait it out take two weeks or more to heal, while suffering far greater pain and discomfort.

It’s also important to understand that this dengue “cure” is not yet accepted as scientifically proven in most countries. The CDC, Mayo Clinic, etc in the United States are still reporting that there is no cure for Dengue Fever. So, if you do contract it, be sure to go to your doctor so you can have your blood checked for hemorrhagic fever, and take papaya leaf on your own. Although the papaya leaf cure has apparently worked for some, there’s not guarantee that it works for everyone, since there’s so much variation in body chemistry from person to person, and the papaya leaf method is not thought to attack the Dengue virus directly, but instead to boost your immune response to it.

References:

http://www.hoaxorfact.com/Health/papaya-leaf-juice-will-cure-dengue-fever-facts-analysis.html
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-09-12/kolkata/33788187_1_platelet-dengue-patients-papaya
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/papaya-leaf-juice-helps-fight-dengue-fever/1022585/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_fever
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00508-009-1229-0
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3614241/


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Park Pavilion Project

Park Pavilion Project:  Gene Inoue and Charlie Pavao are continuing their repairs to Kaiwiki Park pavilion through the association’s community/county partnership.  Their next step is to remove and replace the pavilion’s worn wood ceiling.  (The county supplies the materials; we supply the labor.)
 

Volunteers Needed – we need help with his large scale job. Once the paneling is removed they will assess the condition of the ceiling infrastructure to determine if some of the beams need replacement or the installation work can start. If you’re available to help, please contact me via email or #961-9277-home or Gene at #937-2708-cell. 
KAIWIKI PARK PAVILION CEILING REPLACEMENT PROJECT
Date:      May 17, Saturday
Time:      8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 
Place:     Kaiwiki Park Pavilion
What to bring:  work clothes, hat, hammer and if you have, a crowbar.

Refreshment Brigade:  I’ll set up a table to provide water/soft drinks and food to the volunteers.  If you’d like donate food, help me serve, etc. let me know.

 


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Neighborhood News

Halloween Potluck & Community Meeting—October 25th, Saturday

Don’t forget to come to this Saturday’s community meeting and potluck social!

Date: October 25th, Saturday

Time: 1:00 pm—4:00 pm (or pau)

Place: Kaiwiki Park Pavilion

Raise your concerns, get updates, bring a potluck dish to share and talk story with neighbors and friends. There will be prizes for Best Costume & Scariest Costume!!! Also, if you have fruits & veggies to share with others, bring the goodies to the meeting.

 

Board Secretary Vacancy:

There is a Secretary vacancy on our Board for the remaining 2008-2009 year. Gina Martinez, Board Secretary and hubby Richard Stillman,

Board Member, relocated back to Kauai after living here for three years. Also, George Horike, Board Member resigned due to personal obligations. We thank Gina, Richard & George for their contributions and wish them the best! Last year’s V.P. Ernest Pacheco, and former Board Member Charles Pavao graciously agreed to fill the Board Member vacancies. If you would like serve as Board Secretary, please contact Cindy Inoue at #961-9277. The Secretary attends board and community meetings, takes, transcribes & distributes the meeting minutes & maintains copies for the association archives.

 

Derelict Vehicle Disposal Program Back in Business

Got a junk car or two that you want to legally dispose of? The County of Hawaii has resumed their free pick-up service to Hilo residents. It must be physically possible for a County-contracted tow truck to safely and efficiently remove the vehicle. Ideally they’d like the vehicle(s) close by to the road for easier removal from your property. Call the Vehicle Disposal Program Coordinator (County of Hawaii, Dept. of Environmental Management Division, Vehicle Disposal Dept.) at 961-8552. This program is designed to get rid of your unwanted vehicle(s), improve our island environment, beautify our neighborhood and best of all…it’s FREE! Requests are handled on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Keep Our Roads Clean & Litter Free Tired of seeing rubbish along Kaiwiki Road? Trash is littering the sides of our roadway and the problem is worsening. Did you know there’s $500-1,000 fines for littering? If you see someone littering, write down their license plate #, their vehicle make/model, general location, description of what was blown or thrown out of the vehicle, date/time of the incident, then call the Statewide Litter Hotline at #1.888.592-2522 (it’s an anonymous call) to place your report. Join the fight with Dave & Pat Legge, Gail & John Seavers, Cindy Inoue, son Chris Lowe & other conscientious neighbors.

Help us pick up the rubbish to keep our roads clean. The County Roads Dept. says they’ll pitch in too!!!

 

Officer Todd Pataray Walks the Beat

Officer Pataray is our area’s assigned Community Police Officer. He has been introducing himself to the neighbors around Wainaku Gym this past month and passing out Neighborhood Watch pamphlets. At our Sept. 4th meeting, fellow Community Police Officer William Derr gave a presentation on the importance of developing partnerships with the community to create and sustain a safe and secure environment. Some of you signed up to be part of this program at this meeting which will launch sometime in the new year. If you’d like to join this group, please contact Officer Todd at #961-8121.

 

2008 Wainaku-Kaiwiki Community Association (WKCA) Annual Membership Dues

The annual dues are $10 per household. (Donations for more are always welcome.) So, please do your part and remit your dues with the attached coupon below to: Bill Lowe, 2427 Kaiwiki Road, Hilo, HI 96720, or bring it with you to our next meeting. Please make your dues payable to: WKCA

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

…Margaret Mead, U.S. anthropologist (1901 –1978)

 

Ham Radio or CB Operators Needed

If you are a licensed ham radio or CB operator, and would like to volunteer your services, please contact Cindy at 961-9277. Should there be an emergency and our power/communication lines goes down in the neighborhood, this may be the

only way to communicate with others in and around Kaiwiki Road and the city. Ideally it would great to have several operators on Kaiwiki Road (one above the 6-ton bridge and one on lower Kaiwiki Road). This effort would be part of our neighborhood emergency preparedness plan.

 

Community Road Safety Watch

Here’s your chance to help reduce irresponsible drivers’ repetitive speeding and reckless driving in our community. Call, fax or email the requested information (below) to Traffic Services. 961-2226 call or 961-2228 fax email: hcpd04024@co.hawaii.hi.us

Date & Time of the Occurrence, Vehicle License #, Vehicle Make & Color, Was it a …male or female? (if known); Location of this Violation; Description of the Violation; Your name & phone #This program works…several neighbors filed complaints in the past and action was taken!

 

Kaiwiki Chapel Update

Cindy Inoue and Rebekah Sluss, project leads, made a presentation to Central Christian Church in August and received their approval to help save this 99 year old Chapel on upper Kaiwiki Road.

Since ownership now resides with United Church of Christ (Hawai’i Conference Foundation) in Honolulu, they are waiting to obtain the authority to move forward with this project. Our Board

recently made a decision to remain a grassroots community organization retaining our State of Hawaii non-profit status. Plans will be made to solicit grants and donations through Central Christian Church’s non-profit tax exemption. We’ll keep you posted.

 

Kaiwiki Park Parking Lot Improved

Thanks goes to Glenn Arakawa, County Parks Maintenance Supervisor, for arranging to have 8 Hawaii Correctional Facility inmates help Gene & Cindy Inoue, Ernest Pacheco & Charlie Pavao add gravel to level and enlarge the parking lot. Special shout-out thanks goes to Shelden Kunishige, Kama Glenn, Juan Reyes-Dawson. Brian Santiago, Keone Dagg, Kamano K. Joseph, Stanton Moragia, Aladdin Finley and Correctional

Officer Bronson Malani for their positive can-do attitudes and hard work!!!

 

 


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Neighborhood News

Neighborhood News

Wainaku-Kaiwiki Community Association (WKCA)

July 11, 2008

New Board of Directors Elected for 2008-2009

 

On June 25, 2008 Wainaku-Kaiwiki Community Association (WKCA) hosted it’s 1st meeting of the year.

Twenty (20) neighbors attended this meeting at Kaiwiki Park. Tom Brookman, WKCA President, opened the meeting and elections commenced. Since there was only one candidate for each office, the

members asked the Secretary to cast a unanimous ballot for the slate of candidates. Your nine (9) new association Board of Directors and Newsletter Editor are:

 

President Cindy Inoue

Vice President   Michael Kingston

Secretary Gina Martinez

Treasurer Bill Lowe

 

5 Board Members

Tom Brookman

Marcia Cooley

George Horike

Gene Inoue

Richard Stillman

 

Newsletter Editor: Dan Lindsay

 

Congratulations on your new appointments!

Upper Kaiwiki Road gets a Face Lift After being on the County Highway (Roads) Department’s project “todo” list for more than a decade, upper Kaiwiki Road residents have newly laid asphalt and divider lines!

 

Thanks goes to several Board members who were vigilant in

communicating with the County all these years…and a big

 

Thank You

goes to Council Member Dominic Yagong for meeting with us and ensuring this job was completed. Council Member Yagong and Stanley Nakasone, Director of the County Highway Division and his crew made our dream for safe, improved roadways a reality! They are also looking at alternate exiting routes for upper and lower Kaiwiki Road in case of future emergencies. We don’t want what happened to us on Feb. 1, 2008 to happen again. If you recall, on

that day we had heavy rains and a large tree fell blocking Kaiwiki Road and toppled over power lines stopping many residents from leaving the hill for +10 hours. We’ll keep you posted on their progress.

 

Next Meeting

Mark your calendar to

attend our next meeting

July 19, 2008, Saturday

1:00 p.m.

Kaiwiki Park

 

Save Kaiwiki Chapel

Did you know that Wainaku

Kaiwiki has its own historical Portuguese oven? It’s located just

below Wainaku Gym in the dense overgrowth area that is now covered with tropical foliage.

This two-compartment stone oven was built more than 100 years ago by long-time resident Ernest Pacheco’s grandfather. It was the focal point of our community when baking Portuguese bread, and sharing meals with family and friends was a way of life around the sugar plantation.

 

Time has been hard on this old beauty with the constant Hilo rains and natural erosion. The top of the oven caved in and a tree stump calls one of its oven rooms “home”. We’d like to see what can be done to save part of the oven and erect a commerative sign paying tribute to the way of life that once existed and to the many caring,

hard-working residents who made this the strong community it is today. We’re in discussion with Ernest Pacheco and others exploring ideas to save the oven from the perils of natural.

 

An effort is underway to save this 100 year old plantation chapel

located at 2250-A (upper) Kaiwiki Road.

It was built as a branch chapel to Portuguese Christian Church (now known as downtown Hilo’s Central Christian Church) serving the plantation labor camp families in the region. Last known as

The Church in Hilo, monthly services were offered every 3rd Sunday of the month. Mildred (Pavao) and William Yamamoto devotedly serve as the volunteer grounds care-takers donating their time to maintain the cemetery, lawn and garden. The chapel is deteriorating and the steeple is crumbling. We’re in discussion with United Christian Church (UCC) in Honolulu (parent church) now to see if our Association can save this cornerstone of our community. If given permission to act of their behalf, we will obtain repair cost

estimates.

If the undertaking is within our reach, we will file the State Historical Preservation Division application to see if we can make this a State historical landmark and develop a marketing/communication/fundraising campaign (including a heavy dose of grant writing) to seek the funds we’ll need to begin to restore the chapel.

We will report back on our progress and invite you to participate in saving this neighborhood treasure

.

CERT in our Neighborhood?

The Hawaii County Resource Center offers free CERT Training

(Community Emergency Response Team) to neighborhoods who want to form a team who will participate in a training program that

trains them in basic dsaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood following an event when professional responders (such as the Fire and Police Dept’s) are not immediately available to help. A trained CERT team will provide services that will:

  • Increase their neighborhood’s disaster readiness
  • Assess damage after a disaster
  • Extinguish small fires and teach fire safety
  • Perform basic rescue operations and provide 1st aid